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Hot Shot Cafe in 1929
The Hot Shot Cafe - 1929

Sixteen-year-old L. C. "Buck" Peveto moved to Lubbock in 1925 with his family. He went to work in a cafe started by his father and another man. The Hot Shot Cafe was at 814 Main Street.

His father, J. C. Peveto, retired in 1936 and "Buck" took over the operation until he passed away in 1982. At that time, his wife Ola tried to keep the cafe going, but was forced to sell it and it was converted to office space in 1983.

It was destroyed by the Tornado in May, 1970 and the Peveto's rebuilt. The following is a memory of the Hot Shot Cafe from Mary Lynn Parker, daughter of the Peveto's.

Hot Shot Cafe in 1929
The Hot Shot Cafe in 1941

As far back as memory serves me, I remember my parents, Buck and Ola Peveto, operating the Hot Shot Cafe. As a kid I played in a fenced area behind the building during business hours. Sometimes I would climb up on top of the roof to peek at unsuspecting cars and pedestrians passing below. This adventure would come to a scary end, however, if inmates from the county jail across the street would start yelling at me.

When I was growing up, our family ate most all our meals at the cafe, except on Sundays, when the Hot Shot was closed. Two sisters, Lottie Kyle and Nell Pierce worked there for over thirty-five years. They were like family. Nell was the waitress. She could carry more plates and bowls stacked on her arm than I could carry on a tray.

Lottie was the cook. She knew what most customers were going to order when they walked in the door, When I would come in after school, she would have me a cheeseburger, fries, and Dr. Pepper ready almost by the time I could get to my seat.

As I got into junior high, I would help out during rush periods. The story is told about the time a customer brought back his hamburger because I forgot to put the meat on it. A task I looked forward to was buying new records for the juke box. Not only did I get to make the selections, I was allowed to keep all the proceeds.

I recall my father serving less fortunate people that the church would send in for a meal. But the Hot Shot was best known for its chili. I didn't realize at the time the reputation for Hot Shot chili had spread across the state. To this day I still have people ask me for the recipe.

After daddy passed away in 1982, my mother tried for awhile to continue the tradition, but the task proved to be too much. She sold the place, and it was converted to office space in 1983.

See the full photo gallery of the Hot Shot Cafe through the years >

Submitted by Mary Lynn Parker


Readers: Do you have a great story about Lubbock? Maybe one of your ancestors owned an early business here or was in the local government. Maybe the company you work for has a rich history in Lubbock.

If you have stories and/or photographs about Lubbock's past, we want to hear from you! Send your photos and story copy to the webmaster. All submissions are subject to editing and approval prior to being placed on the website or in the newspaper.

Check back each week as we add stories to this page as our "Readers Remember".


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