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Area crops looking better than expected

1922 "Much better than I had expected" is the answer an Avalanche reporter has heard from more than a dozen farmers within the past week of whom he inquired as to the outcome of their cotton crops.

It was reported Monday morning that in the neighborhood of thirty-six hundred bales had been ginned to date in Lubbock, which further emphasizes the fact that as a cotton producer the Plains country is a big number even during dry times.

The continued drought throughout the summer months has tried every resource of our soil, and it is gratifying to know that is has stood the acid test, and more optimism than was ever known on the Plains before is expressed by men of every profession, trade or business.

In 1919 there were 7200 bales of cotton ginned at Lubbock; 1920 the yield was raised to 9300 and the dry weather of 1921 put the yield of that season down to the 6600 mark, and even then the country prospered. New buildings enlarged businesses, new industries and institutions and even renewed prosperity is the result of the work that was done during that season, and according to estimates given out by local ginners, cotton buyers, and agriculturalists, all boiled down, enlarged, reduced, expanded and summed up together, gives rise to the belief that better than seventy-two hundred bales will be ginned in Lubbock this season, and with half that mark reached already, and the crop just about half gathered, it looks as though a reign of prosperity will be realized here in spite of the disgruntled cry of a pessimistic few who declared a few weeks ago that the cotton crop was totally ruined.

It happens that increased acreage and good farming saved the situation this time, and those who have been on the plains for a few years will admit that the occurrence of that "something" that keeps the plains country on the map makes an annual trip to this section.

Increased acreage of cotton this year has been so great and the yield per acre so good that there is reason for much optimism among our farmers.

Come to Lubbock County.

The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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