The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
Untitled Document
Home
The AJ Remembers
City's Most Influential People
From the Pages of the A-J
Lubbock Landmarks
Centennial Quiz
A-J Readers Remember
Centennial News
Special Sections
1909-1933
1934-1958
1959-1983
1984-2008
Photo Galleries
Centennial Blog
Centennial Discussion

This week's Dirk West Cartoon



Special Section Print Version

Centennial Kick Off by Spotted The Lubbock Centennial Kick Off Celebration

 

 


An example of change; tornado leader

By Terry Greenberg
Avalanche-Journal Editor

David Gutierrez

 

98
David Gutierrez
1953 - present

 

 

Lubbock County’s sheriff is as well known for his singing as he is for a decade leading the sheriff’s department, where he’s worked since 1977, after graduating from Texas Tech.

But his place in history as the county’s first Hispanic sheriff is an example of how the community has changed ... where the perception was a Hispanic could never win a countywide race.

The first Hispanic candidate to run for countywide office received 13 percent of the vote, said Judge Sam Medina, the first Hispanic to win a countywide election. By the time Gutierrez won election in 1998, he received 84 percent of the vote.

“It shows how our community has grown,” said Medina, a longtime friend of the sheriff. “The community elected the best person for the job and they didn’t care what color they were.”


James Granbury



97
James Granbury
1932 - present




The orthodontist served one term as mayor, only nine years after moving to Lubbock, but what a term it was.

Granberry will always be known as the mayor who led Lubbock after the deadly May 11, 1970 tornado.

His actions immediately after the tornado and during the recovery moved him into the state and national spotlight.

At a 1972 dinner held in his honor, Jasy Eagan, said, “Over the past two years he has done yeoman duty, taking time away from his family, his business and other personal interests to work for the citizens.”

When elected, he was Lubbock’s youngest mayor, following time as a member of the city council.

He did not run for re-election, but was the Republican nominee for governor in 1974. He lost to Dolph Briscoe.

He later became chair of the state Parole Board, resigning in 1991 to work as a parole consultant.

He later pled guilty to a federal perjury charge connected to his parole business. He now lives in the Metroplex.

Previous City's Most Influential:


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


HOME / THE A-J REMEMBERS / CITY'S MOST INFLUENTIAL / THIS DAY IN HISTORY / HISTORICAL LANDMARKS / DID YOU KNOW / READERS REMEMBER / CENTENNIAL NEWS
SPECIAL SECTIONS: 1909-1933 / 1934-1958 / 1959-1983 / 1984-PRESENT | PRINT VERSION
PHOTO GALLERIES / BLOGS / FORUMS
CONTACT THE WEBMASTER

copyright 2008 THE LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL and LUBBOCKONLINE.COM