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First female mayor; early cattleman

By Terry Greenberg
Avalanche-Journal Editor

Windy Sitton

 

96
Windy Sitton
1944-present

 

 

She never considered business and politics to be just for men and that philosophy carried her to two terms as Lubbock’s first female mayor.

After graduating from the University of North Texas and Texas Woman’s University, she moved to Dallas and taught in the public schools before moving to Lubbock to be closer to her husband Frank’s oil drilling interests.

After serving on Lubbock’s City Council, she entered the mayor’s office with a vision of unity.

Two important accomplishments as mayor were state and federal designation of the Ports-to-Plains Highway project and brokering a settlement on mineral rights beneath Lake Alan Henry that had threatened to kill or stall work on the water supply for the city.

U.S. Rep. Randy Neugebauer, a former council member himself, said of Sitton: “I enjoyed serving on the council with Windy. She is dedicated and has always worked diligently to promote the City of Lubbock and Texas Tech University.”
She remains active, having served since 2004 on the Texas Tech Board of Regents as well as numerous state boards and commissions.


B. O. McWhorter



95
B.O. McWhorter
1867-1940





At age 20, the cattleman became part of the pioneer migration to the South Plains in 1887, according to the book, “Builders of the Southwest.”

He spent his first night above the Caprock sleeping outdoors in what became Lubbock.

When he married he received the seventh wedding license issued in Lubbock County.

He’s best known as a cattleman and could work a day in the saddle into his 70s.

But McWhorter also was involved in real estate and automobile sales.
He was involved with bringing railroads to Lubbock, was one of the first chamber of commerce leaders and served as a city alderman and county commissioner.

Previous City's Most Influential:


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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