The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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A diplomat, Tech's first president

Dudley Faver

 

90
Dudley Faver
1916-present

 



Dudley Faver has always been a teacher and diplomat … whether in the public school hallways of Levelland, at the Pentagon, or assigned to some foreign posting.

Faver was commissioned a second lieutenant about five weeks before World War II began. His teaching skills pointed him toward an instructor’s role at flight training school. Various postings with the Air Force led him to Lubbock and his love affair with the city. He was named commander of the Advanced Flying Training Program at Reese AFB in 1964.

His 32-year military career carried him to assignments at the Pentagon and command responsibilities in Greece, Turkey and Pakistan.

After retiring as an Air Force major general, he returned to Lubbock in 1980 to teach at Tech’s College of Business. He retired in 1980.

He is the namesake for the Gen. Dudley E. Faver Lecture in International Diplomacy at Texas Tech.


Paul Horn


89
Paul Horn
1870-1932




Texas Technological College’s first president headed the university from its creation in 1923 until he died in office on April 13, 1932.

Paul Whitfield Horn, a Missouri native, planted the anchor for the first institution of higher learning in the western half of Texas and is credited with hiring the first faculty, planning the first buildings and designing a curriculum emphasizing both technical skills and liberal arts.

His promotion of the new college encouraged 914 students to enroll on opening day in September 1925.

In describing the new college he favored this phrase: “Texas Tech is bound on the east by the city of Lubbock and on the west by the Day of Judgment.”

At modern-day Texas Tech, Horn may be better known by the professorship chairs endowed in his name. The Horn professorships were established in 1966 to recognize scholarly achievement and outstanding service.


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The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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