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UMC's leader; two Wilsons made impact




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Jim Courtney
1952-present




He joined the pharmacy staff before then-Lubbock General Hospital was even open in the late 1970s.

By the time he recently retired as president and CEO, his influence was dramatic.

Now named University Medical Center (his suggestion), the hospital grew substanially during Courtney’s leadership and its finances went from shaky to solid.

Some of the changes ... UMC added a heart center, two expansions of the Southwest Cancer Center, a medical office plaza and outpatient pavilion with conference center.



Roscoe Wilson
1881-1936
Smylie C. Wilson
1881-1968

 

 

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Roscoe and Smylie Wilson were not releated.

But they shared the same last name, were both born in 1881, came to Lubbock after the turn of the century (Smylie in 1902 and Roscoe in 1909), served on the Lubbock school board and were heavily involved in the city’s early development.

And they both have Lubbock schools named for them.

Roscoe, an attorney, married Alice Effie Brownfield, whose family the town of Brownfield is named for.

He was a member of the city’s charter commission, secured rights-of-way for rail and a site for Texas Tech, helped organize the chamber of commerce and secure a federal court.

Smylie came to Lubbock to take charge of a struggling hardware store that was later bought by Western Windmill, a company he ran until his 1957 retirement.

The trombone-playing Smylie helped organize Lubbock’s first band, was a charter member of the First Presbyterian Church and was on the locating board for Lubbock’s first junior high.


Previous City's Most Influential:


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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