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Chamber chief, priest had long effects on city




74
John A. Logan
1926-1996




When John Logan hired on in 1962 as director of Lubbock’s Chamber of Commerce, the city had 86,000 residents.

By the time he retired in 1991, he had seen Lubbock grow to a metropolitan area of more than 200,000 with thriving businesses, numerous educational opportunities and a glowing future.

He didn’t just stand by and watch it happen.

The late A-J editor Chas. A Guy, in a column introducing Logan to the community, described him as “a slim, dark bespectacled individual of quiet mein.”

Indeed Logan did work quietly, however his efforts played a large role in the extension of Interstate 27 south to Lubbock, a major commercial coup.

He and others lobbied successfully for four years before the Legislature to land the Texas Tech medical school and the teaching hospital that followed.
He was also instrumental in the development of the Lubbock State School.

He died on March 9, 1996
.



 


73
Father Halfmann
1934-Present




Monsignor Curtis Halfmann found his life’s calling advocating for migrant workers in the cotton fields and barrios of West Texas. His friends say he may be Anglo but he has the heart of a Latino.

Halfmann served parishes in Borger, Lamesa, O’Donnell, Martin, Lockney and Floydada, and ministered to braceros in Dawson and Lynn counties in the ’60s visiting the labor camps and intervening with farmers over poor living conditions. He advocated for them over wage and immigration issues.

His social activism continued during the 17 years he spent at Lubbock’s Our Lady of Grace, where he organized marches against police brutality, worked with union organizers, supported a strike, mobilized a boycott against a power company and pushed for voter registration. All the while, he worked tirelessly with the youth of his parish.

He helped establish Catholic Family Services in the diocese and served as administrator for the diocese in the interim between bishops. Halfmann served as pastor of Our Lady of Grace from 1964-1981 and St. Joseph-Our Lady of Guadalupe Church from 1981-1991. He retired as pastor of St. John Neumann Church in 2001 and is spiritual director for A.C.T.S. retreats.


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The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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