The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Artist, builder of church put marks on city




72
Paul Milosevich
1936-present




In his early years, Paul Milosevich had three primary passions – golf, drawing and country musicians. He built a career that combined all three and gained him national recognition as an artist.

Growing up in Trinidad, Colo., he earned spare change by caddying at a nearby golf course. He picked up the game and developed into a competitive player. Yet he chose a career in art.

He earned a masters in art at Cal State University, Long Beach. He taught art at Texas Tech from 1970 to 1975, leaving to pursue a full-time career as an artist.

A chance meeting with Tom T. Hall gave him a connection to the country music scene.   He became known as a master of portraiture, and has immortalized the Nashville Songwriters Association International Hall of Fame inductees with his distinctive charcoal portraits.

Milosevich combines his love of golf with his passion for art by painting all facets of the game:  players, courses, and the “tools of the golf trade.” Professional golfers he has committed to canvas range from Ben Hogan, his childhood idol, to Ben Crenshaw.

He now resides in Santa Fe.




 


71
H I Robinson
1897-1953




Herndon I. Robinson was considered by many to be the father of the structure which now houses the First Methodist Church.

At the time of his death, construction on the $1 million building was nearing completion. His obituary noted that he liked to think of the new structure as “the cathedral of the West” and his last several years were given to thought and physical effort on its plans and building.

During his tenure he grew the church to 4,546 members, 16th in size among Methodist churches in the nation.
He also was at the forefront of the move to acquire the facility that became Methodist Hospital and is now a part of the Covenant system.

He was born in Madisonville and earned degrees from Lon Morris College and Southern Methodist University. He was a World War I veteran.

He occupied First Methodist’s pulpit for more than 13 years.



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