The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Builder, son, minister had lasting effects




68
J.B Maxey / 1881-1953
and son,
Homer Maxey / 1911-1990

 

 

All across the South Plains cornerstones of businesses, churches, public structures and schools bear the inscription “J.B. Maxey, Contractor.”

Though his formal schooling consisted of only five four-month terms in a one-room school, he became one of the best known contractors in the area. He was active on numerous civic boards and commissions, including 11 years as director of the Lubbock Chamber of Commerce. A 100-acre city park was named in his honor.

His son, Homer Maxey, co-founded a warehouse operation in 1945 known as Plains Plumbing Supply. The firm later came to be known as Homer G. Maxey & Co.

In 1963,  Maxey sold his share of the company to a group of men who were actively managing the business, and it came to be known as Fields and Company.

He also served on the City Council from 1956 to 1960.  Maxey was the father of well-known sculptor Glenna Goodacre.



 



67
Dudley Strain / 1909-2000

 

 


His ministry to the Lubbock community spanned close to four decades.  Although he was senior minister at First Christian Church for much of his time in Lubbock, he probably is better known as the father of CONTACT Lubbock. The nonprofit agency operates a 24-hour crisis hotline manned by volunteers. It serves as a city and regionwide referral service for those in need.

A second service known as Teenline and tailored to the concerns of young people followed the successful start of CONTACT Lubbock.

Strain served Lubbock in a myriad of ways after becoming senior minister at First Christian Church in 1953.

He was born in Pomeroy, Wash., and grew up in Oregon, where he served as pastor of First Christian Church in Salem from 1942 to 1953, when he moved to the Lubbock church. He retired to Albuquerque a few years before his death.

He was the author of two books, “Measure of a Minister,” and “Twenty-two Years on Broadway.”


Previous City's Most Influential:


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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