The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Builders of community, agriculture




66
Marjorie Cone Kastman
1931-present





In reality, Marjorie Kastman has had two full-time careers for most of her life: businesswoman and community volunteer.

As businesswoman, she stepped into leadership of a family investment business and grew it to include oil production and farming at a time when these were deemed to be a male domain.

At a function honoring her with the Rita Harmon Volunteer Service Award in 1996, Robert Ewalt said of Kastman, “The word leader does not adequately describe her. Perhaps a better word would be pioneer or trailblazer.”

Her community service has involved a number of landmarks: first woman to serve on the Athletic Council at Texas Tech, board chair of Methodist Hospital, chair of the Board of City Development, United Way chair and board chair. She also took a leadership role in the founding of the Science Spectrum, Lubbock Landmark Lake Site and the Lubbock International Cultural Center.



 



65
George E. Green
1875-1960





Though he lived in Plainview for most of his life, George Green’s curiosity and his propensity for tinkering had a profound influence on South Plains agriculture.

Frustrated by the inefficiency of water pumps, he used his mechanical talents to design and patent a double-action hand and windmill pump in 1901.

In 1909 he moved from Missouri to Plainview. Frustrated by drought and crop failure, he persuaded the chamber of commerce to sponsor the drilling of an experimental water well. Despite community predictions of failure the new well came in strong.

He later designed and constructed a geared head for a deep-well turbine pump, which gained universal acceptance. He later added automobile motors to drive pumps and devised new types of well casings.

As irrigation expanded, the Green Machinery Co. enjoyed corresponding growth. By the 1950s, his plant included facilities for manufacturing an entire irrigation system.


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