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Educator, jurist left lasting marks on city




64
M.M. Dupre
1866-1925





Marcy Mathias Dupre, a native of Ohio, followed the new railroad to Lubbock in 1914 and brought a strong conviction about the importance of education. He would establish a high-quality public education system in the rapidly growing town of Lubbock in an area of the state seen by others as nothing more than cattle country.

While he was involved in many civic activities, he’s best remembered as an educator. When he arrived as school superintendent, Lubbock had two schools near current downtown Lubbock and 703 students. When he retired there were a half-dozen more schools, including a new high school, and plans for three additional ward schools. Enrollment had reached 3,747.

His focus on the value of education and facilities didn’t end there. His was a strong voice across the state, lobbying for the establishment “of a land grant agricultural college in every way commensurate with the vast territory it will serve” he said of what would become Texas Tech.

Dupre, for whom a Lubbock elementary school is named, died in 1925.



 



63
Judge W.D. Crump
1844-1940





Confederate soldier, war prisoner, land speculator, cattleman, county judge …William Dorsey Crump was one of the most colorful individuals involved in the establishment of Lubbock.

After the Civil War, Crump looked westward for opportunity. His ventures took him to Colorado and eventually to Texas, where he settled for a time in the Dallas area. Ever searching for more land at a bargain price, he knew he hit paydirt when he ascended the Caprock.

In June 1890, he moved to the area permanently, built a home on a section of land and hauled lumber from Colorado City for the first courthouse.
He was involved in efforts to bring railroads, an ice plant, hospitals and Texas Tech to Lubbock.

He was elected county judge in 1898.

In anticipation of the railroad extending into the area, he and others organized the Ripley Townsite Company on a plot that would come to be known as Shallowater.

He died in 1940 at 95.


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