The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
Untitled Document
Home
The AJ Remembers
City's Most Influential People
From the Pages of the A-J
Lubbock Landmarks
Centennial Quiz
A-J Readers Remember
Centennial News
Special Sections
1909-1933
1934-1958
1959-1983
1984-2008
Photo Galleries
Centennial Blog
Centennial Discussion

This week's Dirk West Cartoon



Special Section Print Version

Centennial Kick Off by Spotted The Lubbock Centennial Kick Off Celebration

 

 


Visionaries left marks on ag, education




58
George Simmons
1892-1954





George Simmons built his career on the South Plains’ exploding cotton industry.

The native of Decatur began a lifelong association with the cottonseed business as an oiler in a mill in Hollis, Okla.

By 1923 he was commuting to Lubbock to supervise construction of the Lubbock Cotton Oil Mill. In 1930 he was named manager of the mill and made Lubbock his home.

His driving energy – he is said to have worked seven days a week — and his organizational ability lifted him to positions as a national leader in the cotton processing industry, according to “Builders of the Southwest” published by the Southwest Collection. He served until his death as a director of the Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Association and was active in the National Cotton Council.

He shared his talents and successes with the community also. He served as president of the Lubbock Chamber of Commerce in 1935.

When a new parish school was planned for St. Elizabeth’s Church, the auditorium of the facility was named in his honor.



 



57
F.W. Mattox
1909-2000




Stories are told of F.W. Mattox walking around a 400-acre cotton field on 19th Street, mentally plotting where to place each building and sidewalk of what would become today’s Lubbock Christian University.

His vision and foresight defied the skepticism of those who questioned another college in Lubbock.

He was serving as dean of students at Harding College Academy in 1956 when elders from Broadway Church of Christ asked him to come to Lubbock.

In 1957 the fledgling school opened in temporary buildings as a junior college with 110 students and 14 faculty members. Mattox saw the college grow to a four-year institution by 1972. In 1987 it achieved university status and the name was changed.

Six months before his retirement in 1974, Mattox was selected as the university’s first chancellor, and in 1977 he was named president emeritus.

Upon his resignation, Mattox said, LCU’s founding ideals “are true, fundamental and basic to successful living. These constitute the best answer to man’s spiritual, social, economic and political problems.”


Previous City's Most Influential:


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


HOME / THE A-J REMEMBERS / CITY'S MOST INFLUENTIAL / THIS DAY IN HISTORY / HISTORICAL LANDMARKS / DID YOU KNOW / READERS REMEMBER / CENTENNIAL NEWS
SPECIAL SECTIONS: 1909-1933 / 1934-1958 / 1959-1983 / 1984-PRESENT | PRINT VERSION
PHOTO GALLERIES / BLOGS / FORUMS
CONTACT THE WEBMASTER

copyright 2008 THE LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL and LUBBOCKONLINE.COM