The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Families had a lasting influence

J.E. Murphee
1864-1938
B Sherrod
1893-1984




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The influence of the Murfee and Sherrod families, bedrock members of early Lubbock, can still be seen in the areas of agriculture, business, religion, education and the arts.

Murfee’s first view of the Plains was when his buggy and wagons topped the Caprock in 1904.

Sherrod’s arrival on the South Plains was in 1914 at Old Emma in Crosby County. He would later establish himself as a hardware and appliance businessman in Lubbock.

Murfee’s daughter Mae devoted her life to education. In addition to teaching she served as county superintendent of education and was the only woman member of the committee established to bring Texas Tech to Lubbock. A city elementary school bears her name.

Sherrod’s daughter La Wanda married J.L. Murfee to join the two clans. She remains an accomplished artist with her works shown throughout the city.




Ray Diekemper
1919-1999
Lou Diekemper
1928-present




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Ray and Lou Diekemper made a dynamic team when it came to Lubbock philanthropy.

The Diekempers have established three presidential scholarships at Texas Tech. They were founding members of the South Plains Food Bank.

Ray was an independent oil operator and president of the Lubbock Chamber of Commerce, the Lubbock Economic Council and the Lubbock Rotary Club. He died in 1999.

Lou worked as a group facilitator and workshop presenter on stress management. She has served on many boards and committees, including YWCA, Junior League of Lubbock, Women’s Protective Services, the Science Spectrum board, Southwest Institute for Addictive Diseases board, the Lubbock Area Foundation and many others. She continues her civic work.

Previous City's Most Influential:

#53 - Polk Robinson, Huffman family #54 - Marciano Morales
#55 - Robert Duncan #56 - Roy B. Davis
#57 - F. W. Mattox #58 - George Simmons
#59 - Bobby Moegle #60 - Larry Combest
#61 - Charles C. Crenshaw #62 - George Singer
#63 - Judge W. D. Crump #64 - M. M. Dupre
#65 - George E. Green #66 - Marjorie Cone Kastman
#67 - Dudley Strain #68 - Maxey family
#69 - Caldwell, Hancock, Stubblefield
#70 - Elmer Tarbox
#71 - H. I. Robinson #72 - Paul Milosevich
#73 - Father Halfmann #74 - John A. Logan
#75 - Roscoe and Smylie Wilson #76 - Jim Courtney
#77 - Carolyn Lanier #78 - Waggoner Carr
#79 - "Rip" and Mark Griffin #80 - The Hometown Boys
#81 - Theodore Phea #82 - Dr. Bricker, Dr. Selby
#83 - Sam Medina #84 - Alan White
#85 - Joan Ervin #86 - Sister Maureen Van der Zee
#87 - S. E. Cone #88 - Clent Breedlove
#89 - Paul Horn #90 - Dudley Faver
#91 - Lee Lewis #92 - William Harrod
#93 - James H. Milam #94 - Jane Anne Stinnett
#95 - B. O. McWhorter #96 - Windy Sitton
#97 - James Granbury #98 - David Gutierrez
#99 - Delwin Jones #100 - Retha Martin
They built this city with a lot of work
Lubbock's 'builders' to be featured

 


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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