The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Hispanic media pioneer;cotton giant




48
Adolph Hanslik
1917-2007





He grew up on the family farm in Hallettsville, Texas.

After serving in World War II he became a cotton merchant apprentice in his hometown before moving to Corpus Christi and starting the Adolph Hanslik Cotton Company.

In 1954 he moved the company to Lubbock and for the next half century became one of the most influential people in the cotton industry.

He enjoyed interaction with people in the industry all over the world and enjoyed helping people get into the business, according to his obituary.

He was active in a number of cotton industry groups locally and nationally.






47
Ernesto Barton
1930-present

 

 

There’s a lot of Hispanic media in Lubbock ... and they owe a thank you to the this man.

Barton was born in Laredo and came to Lubbock in 1967 after working at a radio station in Brownfield.

He came to Lubbock to start the first all-Spanish radio station ... KLFB, but it wasn’t easy as flipping a switch and starting to broadcast. (See the continuation on page 16 of the story at the right for the more details.)

Barton started West Texas Hispanic News in 1979 and 14 years ago, with wife Manuela, established KEJS-FM … which focuses on Tejano music and community service.

Barton also served as Lubbock’s first human relations director and has been active in community and educational groups

Previous City's Most Influential:

#49 - The Maines Family #50 - Alan and Sandy Henry
#51 - Ray and Lou Diekemper #52 - Murphee and Sherrod families
#53 - Polk Robinson, Huffman family #54 - Marciano Morales
#55 - Robert Duncan #56 - Roy B. Davis
#57 - F. W. Mattox #58 - George Simmons
#59 - Bobby Moegle #60 - Larry Combest
#61 - Charles C. Crenshaw #62 - George Singer
#63 - Judge W. D. Crump #64 - M. M. Dupre
#65 - George E. Green #66 - Marjorie Cone Kastman
#67 - Dudley Strain #68 - Maxey family
#69 - Caldwell, Hancock, Stubblefield
#70 - Elmer Tarbox
#71 - H. I. Robinson #72 - Paul Milosevich
#73 - Father Halfmann #74 - John A. Logan
#75 - Roscoe and Smylie Wilson #76 - Jim Courtney
#77 - Carolyn Lanier #78 - Waggoner Carr
#79 - "Rip" and Mark Griffin #80 - The Hometown Boys
#81 - Theodore Phea #82 - Dr. Bricker, Dr. Selby
#83 - Sam Medina #84 - Alan White
#85 - Joan Ervin #86 - Sister Maureen Van der Zee
#87 - S. E. Cone #88 - Clent Breedlove
#89 - Paul Horn #90 - Dudley Faver
#91 - Lee Lewis #92 - William Harrod
#93 - James H. Milam #94 - Jane Anne Stinnett
#95 - B. O. McWhorter #96 - Windy Sitton
#97 - James Granbury #98 - David Gutierrez
#99 - Delwin Jones #100 - Retha Martin
They built this city with a lot of work
Lubbock's 'builders' to be featured

 


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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