The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Pioneers in education left lasting marks



28
Clifford B. Jones
1885-1972




The third president of Texas Tech had only a high school education... in fact, he turned down a Yale education to enter the business world.

In 1911, the Kansas native joined his father on the Spur Ranch, 70 miles east of Lubbock. He became ranch manager in 1913 and oversaw the land for 25 years. There he recognized the need for an agricultural and mechanical college in the area. The Legislature approved the establishment of Texas Tech in 1923 and Gov. Pat Neff named Jones to the college's first board of directors and served for 11 years.

Jones would later be named president of the college and serve for five years. If Tech was to grow, Jones realized, the college needed more than he could give. In 1944, citing plaguing health problems, Jones resigned from the presidency; in turn, the board named him president emeritus.

Jones donated the initial $100, 000 for a football stadium to ensure Tech's inclusion in the Southwest Conference. Honoring that gift, Tech named the stadium, which was dedicated in 1947, the Clifford B. and Audrey Jones Stadium.







27
Ella Iles
1889-1952


 


Ella Winn Carruthers Iles was the first permanent African American schoolteacher in Lubbock. She was born in Brenham and began teaching in Temple.

Although she had no friends or family in West Texas, she moved to Lubbock in 1921 to teach the town's African American students. Her first class consisted of 20 students, and she held class in Mt. Gilead Baptist Church.

In 1923, the Lubbock Independent School District approved construction of a two-room stucco school building at 17th Street and Avenue B for black schoolchildren. The school would become Paul Lawrence Dunbar School, named after the prominent African-American poet. Over the next five years, enrollment in the all-black school increased by more than 200 students, a second teacher was hired and a third room was added to the building.

Iles taught first grade and pursued her master's degree until she had to give up teaching in 1948 because of poor health. Lubbock paid tribute to Iles' teaching career in 1951 when an elementary school was named and dedicated in her honor.

Previous City's Most Influential:

#29 - "Dub" Rogers #30 - Linda DeLeon
#31 - Sedberry Family #32 - H. A. Sessions
#33 - Mae Simmons #34 - O. L. Slaton
#35 - Maggie Trejo #36 - Bob Knight
#37 - McMillan Family #38 - Ventura Flores
#39 - Halbert O. Woodward #40 - George Wolffarth
#41 - Spenser Wells #42 - Underwood Family
#43 - Dirk West #44 - Talkington Family
#45 - Grover Murray #46 - Mollie Abernathy
#47 - Ernesto Barton #48 - Adolph Hanslik
#49 - The Maines Family #50 - Alan and Sandy Henry
#51 - Ray and Lou Diekemper #52 - Murphee and Sherrod families
#53 - Polk Robinson, Huffman family #54 - Marciano Morales
#55 - Robert Duncan #56 - Roy B. Davis
#57 - F. W. Mattox #58 - George Simmons
#59 - Bobby Moegle #60 - Larry Combest
#61 - Charles C. Crenshaw #62 - George Singer
#63 - Judge W. D. Crump #64 - M. M. Dupre
#65 - George E. Green #66 - Marjorie Cone Kastman
#67 - Dudley Strain #68 - Maxey family
#69 - Caldwell, Hancock, Stubblefield
#70 - Elmer Tarbox
#71 - H. I. Robinson #72 - Paul Milosevich
#73 - Father Halfmann #74 - John A. Logan
#75 - Roscoe and Smylie Wilson #76 - Jim Courtney
#77 - Carolyn Lanier #78 - Waggoner Carr
#79 - "Rip" and Mark Griffin #80 - The Hometown Boys
#81 - Theodore Phea #82 - Dr. Bricker, Dr. Selby
#83 - Sam Medina #84 - Alan White
#85 - Joan Ervin #86 - Sister Maureen Van der Zee
#87 - S. E. Cone #88 - Clent Breedlove
#89 - Paul Horn #90 - Dudley Faver
#91 - Lee Lewis #92 - William Harrod
#93 - James H. Milam #94 - Jane Anne Stinnett
#95 - B. O. McWhorter #96 - Windy Sitton
#97 - James Granbury #98 - David Gutierrez
#99 - Delwin Jones #100 - Retha Martin
They built this city with a lot of work
Lubbock's 'builders' to be featured

 


The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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